DIET AND FITNESS:

10 Diseases You Can Cure with
Sorghum Molasses

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January 16, 2018

By Ariadne Weinberg, Featured Columnist




Sorghum "black strap" molasses is an old American favorite,
more popular in our grandparents generation. There was a
time when we ate dark molasses instead of light syrups and
jams. But over time, those dark molasses have given way to
lighter syrups and jams and, "coincidentally", we have also
seen a rise in diabetes, osteoporosis and certain types of
cancer. Is there a connection? Scientists now think so. What
diseases do sorghum molasses help us to fight? Should we all
start to eat more black strap molasses?

When I come home for the holidays, the thing I most crave
and makes me feel the most cozy are ginger molasses
cookies.

They have sorghum molasses (sometimes called blackstrap
molasses) in them.

The substance is thick and slow to pour and relatively
exclusive to those cookies, as I don’t consume molasses
regularly. (Little did I know how much I was missing out on
in terms of nutrients, however.)

Sorghum in general refers to a genus of grasses that exist in
tropical and subtropical climates around the world.

Sorghum bicolor, native to Africa, is the variety we put in
food, especially delicious molasses.

Considered a quite important cereal crop, sorghum is also
used for alcoholic beverages, and even biofuel. The grass is
also celiac-friendly.

However, arguably the best benefit is the amount of nutrients
within.

Sorghum molasses and sorghum products in general have a
host of protective and curative benefits for your body.

And no, you don’t have to just eat them in deliciously
indulgent cookies; you can make a tea or try out other
recipes.

Read on to find out about how sorghum molasses lifts your
health back up where it belongs.









































1.
Iron Deficiency Anemia
    
Anemia occurs when the blood doesn’t have enough red
blood cells to properly carry oxygen to organs and tissues.
This may cause you to feel tired, cold, weak, lightheaded, or
dizzy. The University of Maryland Medical Center recommends
sorghum molasses to prevent iron deficiency anemia. Putting
a tablespoon of the stuff in hot water, mixing, and
consuming, should do the trick. Iron deficiency anemia could
be caused by a simple lack of iron in the diet, an ulcer, heavy
menstruation, or pregnancy.

2.
Osteoporosis

You can take sorghum molasses to build better bones before
this even becomes an issue, of course. The substance
contains many nutrients to fortify your exoskeleton, including
200 milligrams of calcium, 100 milligrams of magnesium, and
450 milligrams of potassium per tablespoon.

Susan E. Brown, bone nutritionist and author of "Better
Bones, Better Body" affirms the effectiveness of blackstrap
molasses.

As well as the above-listed nutrients, she adds that just two
tablespoons of sorghum molasses per day will get you your
daily dose of manganese.

3.
Digestive Issues

Given the high content of dietary fiber that sorghum molasses
contains (a single serving of sorghum contains 48% of the
recommended intake of dietary fiber), the substance can
patch up a host of digestive issues, including: bloating,
constipation, stomach aches, excess gas, and diarrhea.

In a 2017 report, K. Krogh, from the Aarhus University
Hospital in Denmark, recommended dietary fiber to those with
chronic constipation. While extra fluid intake and exercise are
also good ideas, sorghum molasses is a gentle and delicious
laxative.

4.
Diabetes Control

Glycemic control is key to managing diabetes. Luckily,
sorghum modulates glucose response in many individuals. In
a 2016 Brazilian study, ten subjects were reported to a lab
after 12 hours of overnight fasting. P.C. Anunciacao and
researchers from the Universidade Federal de Vicosa gave
those being tested two different kinds of sorghum drinks, a
control, and a drink without sorghum.

Thirty minutes later, test subjects consumed the glucose
solution. Glycemic response was monitored at 0, 15, 30, 45,
60, 90, and 120 minutes.

Here is what they found. Eating sorghum molasses 30
minutes before the glucose drink lead to a lower glycemic
response, especially when the sorghum solution contained
proanthocyanidins and deoxyanthocyanins.

5.
Heart Issues

The excess fiber in sorghum molasses prevents heart attack
and stroke. A meta analysis performed in 2017 by M.P. McRae
and researchers at the National University of Health Sciences
in Lombard, Illinois, revealed positive results.

After searching English language publications with
quantitative statistical analysis on cardiovascular disease, lipid
concentrations, and blood pressure on PubMed from between
January 1st, 1980 and January 31st 2017, they found that
those who consume the highest amount of dietary fiber
significantly reduce their incidence and mortality from
cardiovascular disease.

6.
Cancer Prevention

The substances in sorghum especially prevent colorectal and
esophageal cancer. However, with their phenolic acids and
flavonoids with antioxidant and anti inflammatory properties
the substance is a good protective factor for all kinds of
things. J.K.P. Vanamala from the Pennsylvania State
University confirms bioactive compounds that document anti
cancer activities.

7.
Hypertension

A few tablespoons of molasses a day keeps the high blood
sugar away. Forget that spoonful of sugar. Two tablespoons
of molasses each day contains 16% of the recommended
daily intake of potassium. According to the American Heart
Association, a diet with natural sources of potassium is
important because the mineral lessens the effects of sodium,
which does contribute to hypertension. Magnesium and
calcium, other ingredients in sorghum molasses, have been
observed to lower systolic and diastolic blood pressure, as
well.

8.
Premenstrual Syndrome

The majority of those of us who menstruate experience at
least a few unfortunate PMS symptoms.

Luckily, sorghum molasses can help us out. As mentioned,
iron depletion from menstruation gets a boost from the high
iron content of blackstrap molasses.

However, according to Elaine Magee, University of California
Berkeley nutritionist, consuming that sorghum stuff also
offsets other symptoms such as depression, irritability, breast
tenderness, bloating, and acne. Magnesium and manganese,
also abundant in sorghum molasses, aid in preventing
menstrual cramps as well.

9.
Depression

Depression, whether chronic or not, can be helped out with a
dose of molasses.

Vitamin B6 raises serotonin levels, and the lack of the nutrient
has been linked with depression, according to a 2004 article
by A.M. Hvas from the Aarhus University in Denmark.

The lack of B6 has also been observed to cause more anxiety,
anger, and obsessive compulsive behaviors, in some cases.
Magnesium is also key in preventing depression, and
magnesium levels tend to be depleted when someone is
already depressed. If your mental and physical health is
lagging in this way, be sure to make some molasses tea.


10.
Celiac Disease

Well, sorghum doesn’t exactly cure celiac disease, but they
have found the food to be a totally safe alternative to gluten
products. So, as long as you aren’t using traditional flour,
you can eat those ginger molasses cookies without worrying.
A 2013 report by P. Pontieri from the Istituto di Genetica
Vegetale in Napoli, Italy confirms that sorghum doesn’t
contain peptides that are toxic for celiac patients.




















































You're just getting started. Learn more about the relationship
between your diet and your risk for other diseases and
conditions:
Read more recipes from this author /Beets Lower
Blood Pressure-But There's a Big Catch/ Healing Foods Links
/
How Much Is Too Much Salt? /Sugar-The Disease
Connection / Are Diet Sodas Bad for Your Health? / Ideal
Breakfast for Diabetics / Ideal Breakfast for Arthritis /Healing
Foods Links /  Foods That Shrink Your Waist / Foods That
Lower Cholesterol/ VLDL-The Other Cholesterol/ Foods That
Reduce Blood Pressure


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