Continued from page 1

Ovarian Cancer --Top 10 Signs You
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Last updated March 22, 2017 (originally published March 31, 2013)

By Alison Turner, Featured Columnist





4.
Feeling Bloated Can Indicate Ovarian Cancer

Do you know the most common symptoms of ovarian
cancer?  Pain and bloating.  One of the studies above reports
that abdominal pain is the most common symptom of ovarian
cancer.  That may be true in the UK, but, in Australia, women
with ovarian cancer report that bloating or feeling full is their
most common symptom.  In 2011, researchers from
Australia found that abdominal bloating --- even more so
than abdominal pain --- is more often mentioned by women
diagnosed with ovarian cancer.

In 2011, a team of researchers from various institutions in
Australia, including Marian K. Pitts with the Australian
Research Center in Sex, Health & Society at La Trobe
University in Melbourne,  set out to identify the prevalence of
symptoms associated with ovarian cancer in 2,235 Australian
women.  

Abdominal bloating showed the highest prevalence, at a rate
of 52%, followed by abdominal pain, increased abdominal
size, pelvic pain, and “feeling full quickly.”  Unfortunately for
the person trying to diagnose the problem, less than 10% of
these women regarded these symptoms as “severe.”

If abdominal bloating doesn’t calm down in a few days you
may want to take it more seriously than contributing it to a
plucky batch of baked beans. (Read more about
natural
remedies for bloating.)

5.
Endometriosis: The Growing Line of Ovarian Cancer.

When the cells lining a woman’s womb grow into other areas
of the body, there may be pain, bleeding, infertility, and a
diagnosis involving the word
endometriosis.  Once a month,
among the long list of changes in a woman’s body, her
ovaries produce hormones that tell the endometrial cells to
swell and get thicker.

Under healthy circumstances, these extra cells are removed
with the monthly period.  But when a woman has
endometriosis, however, endometrial cells implant and grow
outside of the uterus, creating not only feels a lot of pain ,
but also a possible higher risk for ovarian cancer.

In 2012, a team of specialists working in institutions
throughout Australia, including Louise Stewart with the
School of Population Health at the University of Western
Australia in Crawley,  examined the relationship between
epithelial ovarian cancer and endometriosis in over 20,000
women seeking treatment for infertility.  

Data showed that women with endometriosis who had not
had children had a “three-fold increase in the rate of ovarian
cancer.”

If endometriosis indicates ovarian cancer, there will be lots
of treatment down the road.  However, if endometriosis
seems to be only endometriosis (for now), treatment options
include medication, surgery, and relaxation and exercise
techniques. (Read more about
foods that help endometriosis
symptoms.)

6.
Excess Hair on Your Face Can Be a Sign of Ovarian Cancer






























Women are under a lot of pressure these days to keep their
body in a certain shape, their skin clear, their hair healthy,
and their hair where it should be.  However, as is the case
with all physical traits, every body is different.  Some of us
are born with more hair than others, and some of us spend
all kinds of money and time to change that, while others
barely notice.  

However you feel about hair growth on you or someone else’
s body, there is one situation where you might want to
notice.  Hirsutism is the term describing the condition of
unwanted, excessive amounts of coarse hair on the face
chest and back. And, according to experts in Italy, hirsutism
could be a warning sign for ovarian cancer.

In 2013, scientists at the University of Genoa in Italy,
including Lara Vera with the Department of Internal
Medicine,  investigated a particular type of ovarian cancer,
accounting for less than 5% of ovarian cancer cases ---
Granulosa-cell tumors.  

The team encountered an 18 year-old woman with hirsutism
and
irregular periods.  Abdominal imaging showed a 19 cm
mass in the left ovary.  Only 24 hours after the mass was
removed, “menstrual flow reappeared and androgens
progressively normalized.”  After three months “hirsutism
had decreased slightly.”

If someone you know can’t seem to keep their body hair
where they want it to be, and it doesn’t seem to run in the
family, it may be worth checking out for ovarian cancer.

7.
Back Pain Is a Sign of Ovarian Cancer

The older we get, the more we have to start looking out for
that notorious aching back.  And while most of the time we
may wish that kind of pain could disappear without a trace,
there are other times where our back might not be a pain in
the neck (pun!) but rather a friend telling us to be careful.  
Experts from New York find that back pain could indicate a
particular kind of ovarian tumor.

In 2012, experts at the Albert Einstein College of
Medicine/Montefiore Medical Center in New York, including
Ryan J. Callery with the Department of Obstetrics and
Gynecology  reported on a 47 year old patient “with back
pain over her right rib cage.”  

The patient underwent imaging, a biopsy, and other tests,
and was eventually diagnosed with “Stage IVB serous
ovarian carcinoma.”  The team explains that this is “an
extremely rare method for ovarian cancer to initially
present.”  

Just because a sign is "rare" does not mean it can be safely
ignored.

So, the next time your
aching back starts talking, you might
want to consider listening to what it’s saying. (Read more
about
natural remedies that help back pain.)

8.
Body Type and Ovarian Cancer: The Shape of Risk

We can follow diets, commit to exercise regimes, and still we
will be an apple or a pear.  Some of us consider our body’s
shape a curse, no matter how earnestly others tell us it’s a
gift: unfortunately, according to research from Sweden,
sometimes the curse part is right.

In 2011, specialists in Sweden, including Jenny Brandstedt
with the Center for Molecular Pathology at Lund University in
Malmo, Sweden,  analyzed how the body measurements of
93 women related to their risk of epithelial ovarian cancer.

The women’s height, weight, BMI, waist and hip
circumference, and waist-hip ratio were measured: results
showed that while height, weight, BMI, and waist and hip
circumference were not associated with risk of ovarian
cancer, a high waist-hip ratio was “associated with a
statistically significantly lower overall risk” for epithelial
ovarian cancer.

In other words, being shaped more like an apple rather than
a pear puts you at greater risk for developing ovarian cancer.
But even if you tend towards an apple shape, you should
nonetheless try to tip the odds in your favor by doing all you
can to
decrease your waistline.

9.
When Fertility Drugs Don't Work: Warnings of Ovarian
Cancer.

What could be more frustrating than spending the time and
money on fertility drugs, and then finding out that they don't
work?  How about the combination of taking those drugs
and not having children increasing your risk for ovarian
cancer?

In 2012, researchers at various departments with the
University of Pittsburgh, including Brenda Diergaarde with
the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute,  analyzed
whether the use of fertility drugs impacted the risk of
ovarian cancer in over 900 women.  

Results showed that while using fertility drugs did not impact
the risk for ovarian cancer in most women, those women
who used fertility drugs and never bore children “may have
an elevated risk for ovarian cancer.”

The tricky part about the above study is that you won't
know that fertility drugs don't work for you until they don't.  
Starting fertility medication is a serious decision for many
reasons (the results of this study being only one of them)
that you should discuss thoroughly with your doctor and
partner.

10. P
elvic Inflammatory Disease: A Painful Path to Ovarian
Cancer?

Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is the infection of the
uterus, fallopian tubes, and other reproductive organs that
cause symptoms like lower abdominal pain (sound familiar?  
See above). PID can not only lead to infertility, and chronic
pain , but could also indicate ovarian cancer.

In 2011, H.W. Lin and other specialists at the Soochow
University in Taipei, Taiwan , investigated whether PID
increased the risk of developing ovarian cancer in 90
women.  The data revealed “an association between PID and
ovarian cancer,” so that, the team suggests, PID might even
be a marker for ovarian cancer to increase the odds of early
treatment.  

PID is regrettably common: the Center for Disease Control
approximates that more than 750,000 women "experience
an episode of acute PID" every year.   This means that PID
does not guarantee a future of ovarian cancer: however, it is
a symptom to watch out for.

10.
Urgency of Urination --You Need to Go!

Urgency to urinate is one of the most common ---and most
overlooked ---  symptoms of ovarian cancer. In fact, other
than abdominal pain or bloating and feeling full, having the
need to urinate frequently or urgently is perhaps one of the
most tell-tale signs of ovarian cancer, according to a 2010
study led by Dr. Maryanne Rossing of the Fred Hutchinson
Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Washington.







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[Meet the
Doctors and Registered Nurses on our Medical
Review team.]






















































Related:  
Why Is My Period So Heavy? /
Why Can't I Get Pregnant? /
Hair on My Face --Causes and Top 10 Natural Remedies /
Ideal Diet to Reduce Fibroid Tumors /
Pelvic Cancer-Symptoms and Treatments
/How to Lose Weight After Menopause

/Best Breakfast to Fight Arthritis/ Health Dangers of Milk /
Lose Weight by Lowering Thermostat / Lose Belly Fat After
the Baby/ Foods That Shrink Your Waist/ Drinking Cold
Water Burns Calories / Six Pack Abs-A Guided Tour /Top 10
Foods That Fight Anemia / How Much Is Too Much Salt?
/
Sugar-The Disease Connection / Are Diet Sodas Bad for
Your Health? / Ideal Breakfast for Diabetics / Ideal
Breakfast for Arthritis /Healing Foods Links /  Foods That
Shrink Your Waist / Foods That Lower Cholesterol/ VLDL-
The Other Cholesterol/ Foods That Reduce Blood Pressure

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FOODS THAT LOWER YOUR
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Chronic back pain can be a sign of ovarian
cancer.