Smoking and Diabetes --How
Smoking Raises Your Blood Sugar
Related Links
Top 10 Natural Ways to Stop Smoking
Ideal Breakfast for Diabetics
Natural Insulin Foods
Normal Fasting Blood Sugar
Smoke Gets In Your Eyes-Health Dangers of Volcanic Ash

Foods That Lower Your Blood Pressure
Ideal Breakfast for High Blood Pressure
Blue Legs -Top 10 Causes and Cures
Foods That Lower Cholesterol
Salmon Health Benefits
Fish Oil Benefits -Count the Ways
Magnesium--The Forgotten Essential Mineral
Ideal Diet to Reduce Fibroid Tumors
Ideal Diet for Endometriosis
Inflammation --The Secret Link to Disease
VLDL-The Other Cholesterol
Waist Size Matters
Bowel Movements Indicate Your Overall Health
Snoring Linked to Stroke
My Heart Attack-Personal Stories from Survivors
How Much Salt Is In My Food?
How Much Sugar Is In My Food?

May 30, 2010, last updated April 12, 2013

By Katrina Devine, Contributing Columnist and Susan
Callahan, Health Editor

[Health and fitness articles are reviewed by our team of
Registered Nurses, Certified fitness trainers and other
members of our Editorial Board.]



Few people will be surprised by the revelation that smoking
is bad for you. But what happens if you add smoking and the
silent killer that is diabetes together? Does smoking increase
blood sugar? The answer, according to research, is "yes". In
fact, it’s a recipe for disaster. Not only is smoking dangerous
for those who already have been diagnosed with diabetes,
it's also a danger for those simply
at risk of developing the
disease.


According to the latest Centers for Disease Control figures
7.8% of Americans have been diagnosed with diabetes. And,
some 46 million adult Americans smoke --that's 20.6% of all
adults. What is the impact of smoking on blood sugar?


The effect of nicotine on blood sugar have been known since
the 1930’s. A study conducted by Dr. William J. McCormick
published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal in
1936 discussed how cigarettes raise blood sugar. In his
research he found that the blood sugar would return to
normal within 30 minutes after smoking the cigarette.


Smoking causes hyperglycemia --extremely high blood sugar
--- which happens when the way your body processes
insulin is interfered with, causing a rise in blood sugar. This
is the effect that we saw the evidence for above. This is also
known as insulin resistance.


Insulin resistance occurs when your body does not absorb
insulin properly and, to compensate, your blood sugar rises.
In
pre-diabetes, your blood sugar level does not rise as high
as diabetes levels but as the name suggests you are on your
way to diabetes if the situation gets worse.  



























Smoking can raise your blood sugar 15% in just 30
minutes.  In 1966 researchers at Murchison and Fyfe of
Western Infirmary in Glasgow, Scotland found that an
increase of blood glucose levels from 4.21 mmol/L (75.8
mg/dl) to 4.93 mmol/L (88.8 mg/dl) occurred within 30
minutes of smoking a cigarette -- an increase of 12 points.


The news gets even worse. A second study 20 years after
the first one found an even more dramatic effect of smoking
on blood sugar. In 1986, a study led by Arvind T. Modak at
the Department of Pharmacology, The University of Texas
Health Science Center, San Antonio in 1986  found that 2.5
mg of nicotine increased blood glucose levels by 29%.

Since the  average cigarette contains 1 mg of nicotine, this
means that smoking just 2 to 3 cigarettes a day can spike
your blood sugar by 29%.


In addition to this effect on your blood sugar, research
shows that there is another very serious effect that smoking
has on diabetics and those who are at risk of developing the
disease. The research detailed below shows that smoking
when you have diabetes can lead to a worsening of other
conditions that are associated with diabetes.


According to the Centers for Disease Control, people with
diabetes are 2 to 3 times more likely to die from heart failure
or stroke.


A 1986 study completed at the Department of Metabolic
Diseases and Nutrition, WHO Collaborating Center for
Diabetes at the University of Düsseldorf, Germany compared
192 smokers with type 1 diabetes with 192 non-smokers
who also had type 1 diabetes. They found that smoking was
related to the early onset of problems related with diabetes.
In particular, smoking was linked to heart problems, kidney
problems and eye damage.


Dr. James O. Menzoian of Boston University Medical School in
1989 studied 227 diabetes patients. This research team
found that those who smoked were more likely to get
gangrene or ulcers.


Can you reverse your risks for developing diabetes, heart
trouble and the other health problems if you stop smoking?
A study by the Department of Epidemiology and Public
Health, University College London, UK published in 1997
looked  specifics of how quitting smoking can reduce the
risks mentioned above. They studied a total of 4,427 people
with diabetes. Those who had quit smoking in the previous
10 years were at a higher risk than those who had no
smoked in over 10 years. And those who had been smoking
for 30 years or longer when they quit were at a significantly
higher risk.


A 2001 study led by Laura J. Scott of the Havard School of
Public Health discovered that smokers are at a significantly
greater risk for hypergylcemia than non-smokers. In
addition, the smokers increased their risk for kidney damage,
also known as debetic nephropathy.


The final word on this issue stems from a 2003 study
conducted by Björn Eliasson of the Lundberg Laboratory for
Diabetes Research, Sahlgrenska University Hospital,
Göteborg, Sweden. That study discovered that people with
diabetes were 50% more at risk from the effects of smoking.


Smoking Is Dangerous Even for Those Simply At Risk for
Diabetes

There also seems to be a danger for those who are simply at
risk
for developing diabetes. A study conducted on mice by
the Charles Drew University of Medicine and Science in Los
Angeles and the Western University of Health Sciences in
Pomona, California in 2009 looked at how nicotine effects
insulin production. They injected the mice with nicotine twice
daily and found that they had increased levels of the stress
hormone cortical which is known to cause insulin resistance--
also known as pre-diabetes. Of course this research was
done on mice and not humans, so further work is necessary
before we can state with assurance how much smoking puts
you at ris for developing diabetes.



In summary, here are the facts. If you are already diabetic,
smoking can spike your blood sugar by as much as 29%.
Even as few as 1 or 2 cigarettes can drive your blood sugar
sky high. Now, over time, the higher levels of sugar in your
blood puts you at risk for other conditions related such as
heart disease and stroke.

[Update:

Smoking Increases the Risk of Eye Damage in Diabetics


Diabetes can cause eye damage, called diabetic retinopathy.
This eye condition is marked by the build up of oxidative
stress.  As a result, diabetics tend to have far more of the
compounds scientists use to measure oxidative stress --
reactive oxidative metabolites.  

Smoking makes the eye damage worse by reducing helpful
anti-oxidants in your blood stream which otherwise would
be available to combat retinopathy, according to a 2012
study from Dokkyo Medical University Koshigaya Hospital in
Koshigaya, Japan. ]


Related:
Ideal Breakfast for Diabetics /
Normal Fasting Blood Sugar / Natural Insulin Foods That
Help You Control Your Blood Sugar / Smoke Gets In Your
Eyes-Lingering Health Dangers from Volcanic Ash /  Vitamin
B3 (Niacin)-A Powerful Ally Against Cholesterol / Swollen
Ankles -Causes and Cures//How Much Is Too Much Salt?
/
Sugar-The Disease Connection / Are Diet Sodas Bad for
Your Health? // Ideal Breakfast for Arthritis /Healing Foods
Links /  Foods That Shrink Your Waist / Foods That Lower
Cholesterol/ VLDL-The Other Cholesterol/ Foods That
Reduce Blood Pressure

Index of Articles on
This Site


Snoring Linked to
Stroke

How to Stop Bad Breath

BRAIN HEALTH



DIETS AND FITNESS

HOW MUCH IS TOO MUCH
SALT

HOW MUCH SALT IS IN MY
FOOD

SALT CONTENT OF COMMON
FOODS

150,000 DIE FROM EXCESS
SALT

I HAVE HIGH BLOOD
PRESSURE!

FOODS THAT LOWER YOUR
BLOOD PRESSURE

QUINOA-THE NEW
SUPERFOOD

INFLAMMATION INSIDE
THE BODY

FAT--IT'S ALIVE!

WHY WE GO SOFT IN THE
MIDDLE

WHY EUROPEANS ARE
THINNER

>VEGETARIAN RECIPES


MY HEART ATTACK

CANCER SURVIVORS


MONEY AND BUDGET

RESOURCES

AMERICAN HEART
ASSOCIATION

LINKS AND RESOURCES

Home  > Conditions  >
Diabetes > Here
COLLECTIVE
WIZDOM.COM

Healthy Body, Healthy Mind, Healthy Life
Custom Search

About Us

Register

Privacy Policy

Editorial Policy

Contact Us

Disclaimer : All information on www.collectivewizdom.com is for educational purposes only. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice. For
specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, please consult your doctor.  

(c) copyright collectivewizdom.com 2007 -2014 and all prior years. All rights reserved.
Collectivewizdom,LLC is located at 340 S Lemon Ave #2707 Walnut, CA 91789  
Subscribe in a reader