Home  > Healing Foods  > Arthritis Diet > You Are Here



Why Do I Have Pits in My Nails?

Related Links:
Arthritis - Causes and Top 10 Natural Remedies

Neck Arthritis-Causes and Top 10 Natural Remedies

Best Breakfast to Fight Arthritis Inflammation and Pain

Osteoarthritis -7 Natural Remedies

Osteoporosis-Top 10 Natural Remedies

Soft Bones? - Symptoms and 7 Natural Remedies

Why Do My Knees Pop?-Causes and Cures

Having Trouble Kneeling and Getting Back Up? - What That Means for Your Health

Does Cracking Your Knuckles Cause Arthritis?

My Aching Bones -Foods That Help

Frozen Shoulder -Top 10 Tips

Numbness in Hands-Causes and Cures



November 6, 2017
By
Susan Callahan, Associate Editor and Featured Columnist







Among the many mysteries of the human body is that signs of
something is seriously wrong often show up in our fingernails.
We know, for example, that signs of arsenic poisonings show
up as white lines in your fingernails. That's why seeing pits
suddenly appear in your nails is something you should not
regards as trivial.  What does cause pits in your fingernails or
toenails?  Are there any harmless explanations for pits in your
nails?

To let the cat out of the bag early, the most common
explanation for pits in your nails is a kind of arthritis called
"psoriatic arthritis"

To my surprise, I have learned that arthritis is not just one
disease.  What we call "arthritis" describes about 100 diseases,
including the best known ones such as osteoarthritis,
rheumatoid arthritis and gout as wells as dozens of lesser
known forms of arthritis.  Psoriatic arthritis is one of these
lesser-known forms of arthritis.

Psoriatic arthritis is caused by psoriasis, the auto-immune
disease that causes flaky skin.  Here are some of the other
symptoms of psoriatic arthritis:


Sausage Fingers

Has the swelling in your joints spread all along the finger,
giving them the appearance of sausages? This sausage-finger
appearance is unique to psoriatic arthritis. With rheumatoid
arthritis, for example, only the joints themselves are swollen.
When you look at your hands, you will see huge knuckles but
otherwise your hands will appear normal.


Heel Pain or Enthesitis

With psoriatic arthritis, the achilles tendons in the heels often
are affected, making it sometimes difficult to walk.


Flaky Skin of Course

Psoriatic arthritis is a manifestation of the overall condition of
psoriasis, so of course you should expect to see red, flaky skin
patches typical of psoriasis.
more common forms of thesArthritis itself simply means
inflammation of the joints, so the word tells you nothing at all
about what actuallu caused the inflammation of the joints to
appear.

Does Having Psoriasis Mean I will Develop Psoriatic Arthritis?

One study has looked at the how well nail pits and other
symptoms of psoriatic arthritis predicts your chances for
getting full-blown psorias. In 2015, scientists in Portugal's
Centro Hospitalar do Porto, looked at nail psoriasis as a
predictor of psoriasis.

In fact, having nail psoriasis means you already have the
disease of psoriasis, they confirmed. Moreover, about 30% of
psoriasis patients go on to develop nail psoriasis.

Skin lesions actually come before nail pits or other symptoms
on the extremities in "more than 75-80% of patients with
psoriatic arthritis", the scientists found.


But Here's Where It Gets a Little Weird -- Smoking Increases
Your Risk for Nail Psoriasis But Not Overall Skin Psoriasis



In 2017, a study led by the University of Massachusetts Medical
School discovered something odd. They surveyed the health
records of 6.65 million people who, in 1995, did not have
psoriatic arthritis.  Twenty years later in 2015, they found that
225, 213 of these people had developed psoriasis and  7057
had developed psoriatic arthritis as a side effect of the psoriasis.

But when they looked further to see which of these people
smoked, they discovered something counterintuitive. Smoking
increases your risk for developing psoriatic arthritis evidence
by changes in your fingernails but it does not raise your risk for
developing skin psoriasis.



Is There Any Proven Way to Treat Psoriatic Arthritis?





























Some of the most interesting scientific studies that have
examined treatment for psoriatic arthritis have looked at the
role that gut bacteria plays in the disease.

For years, scientists have observed a connection between nail
psoriasis and inflammatory bowel disease.  Light was shed on
the connection with the understanding of how bacteria in our
gut affects inflammatory disease in general.  

The pioneering research in this area is funded by the US
National Institutes of Health.

We humans have inside of us a natural community of bacteria
in our guts. These intestinal bacteria are with us from the time
we emerge from the birth canal. There are over 1000 species of
these bacteria in the average adult. The number of individual
bacteria is estimated to number in the trillions.

The collective term we use to refer to the community of
bacteria is the "microbiome". Scientists have learned that these
bacteria
 in your microbiome play pivotal roles in determining
who gets sick, and with what disease and who stays healthy.


Your Microbiome Can Turn on or Off the Inflammatory
Responses That Cause Nail Psoriasis
  


In particular, your microbiome appears to play a role in
triggering auto-immune diseases such as psoriasis.  In 2016,
Dr. Tejpal Gill and Dr. Mark Asquith of the National Institute of
Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases led a study
examining the connection between the microbiome and nail
psoriasis.


What they found was that, in nail psoriasis, the gut microbiome
is deficient in a particular species of bacteria. This bacteria
species is called "Firmicutes".

The Firmicutes species particularly lacking are Faecalibacterium
prausnitzii and Clostridium leptum.

People with inflammatory bowel disease as well as psoriatic
arthritis are deficient in these types of gut bacteria.

Other studies have found that "Coprococcus" is key to whether
you develop psoriatic arthritis.

A  2015 study from New York University and New York
University Hospital for Joint Diseases found another bacteria
important to preventing nail psoriasis. This study found that
sufferers with nail psoriasis had very few "Coprococcus
species, while samples from PsA patients were also
characterized by a significant reduction in Akkermansia,
Ruminococcus, and Pseudobutyrivibrio".

By the way, these bacteria are also instrumental in breaking
down mucous in your body.

How to Increase the Amount of Firmicutues and Coprococcus
in Your gut to Stop Nail Psoriasis


Changing your gut requires that you eat differently.
Repopulating your gut with firmicutes means first and foremost
savoiding foods that kill off these bacteria. Then, you have to
eat foods that replenish the bacteria.

Positive bacteria such as firmicutes like to eat foods which are
pre-biotic. These foods include radishes, carrots.

These beneficial health-promoting bacteria eat foods such as
resistant starches. These are starches that resist digestion until
they reach your large intestine.

They eat and derive energy from foods that include re-heated
pasta, inulin (found in artichokes and other foods), pectin,
arabinoxylan and cellulose, according to a 2016 study led by
Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium.  

So, that second-day leftover spaghetti is key to your health,
after all. Re-heating pasta after it cools down actually
transforms the pasta into resistant starch which can help you
combat and even reverse psoriatic arthritis.  Add inulin to your
diet by eating asparagus, onions, garlic, leeks and bananas.

One of the best ways to make sure you are feeding your
intestinal bacteria properly is to slow cook a generous amount
of onions, carrots, asparagus at the end of the week. Add this
mixture to soups and side dishes as well as that leftover pasta
throughout the week.









































Related:  
Best Breakfast for Arthritis

Neck Arthritis-Causes and Top 10 Natural Remedies

Soft Bones? -Symptoms and 7 Natural Remedies

Frozen Shoulder -Top 10 Tips

Osteoporosis- Top 10 Natural Remedies

My Aching Bones -Foods That Help

Numb Hands -Causes and Cures

Ideal Breakfast for Diabetics / Ideal Breakfast for
Hypoglycemia /Foods That Shrink Your Waist/ Foods That
Reduce Blood Pressure

Break Through Your Diet Plateau

How Many Calories Do I Burn?

Quinoa-The New Superfood?

How Many Calories Do I Burn?

Ideal Breakfast for Hypoglycemia


DIETS AND FITNESS

BOWEL MOVEMENTS

INTESTINES-KEEP THEM
HEALTHY

QUINOA-THE NEW
SUPERFOOD

HOW MUCH IS TOO MUCH
SALT

HOW MUCH SALT IS IN MY
FOOD

SALT CONTENT OF COMMON
FOODS

150,000 DIE FROM EXCESS
SALT

I HAVE HIGH BLOOD
PRESSURE!

FOODS THAT LOWER YOUR
BLOOD PRESSURE

INFLAMMATION INSIDE THE
BODY

FAT--IT'S ALIVE!

WHY WE GO SOFT IN THE
MIDDLE

WHY EUROPEANS ARE
THINNER

>VEGETARIAN RECIPES


MY HEART ATTACK

CANCER SURVIVORS
BRAIN HEALTH

>CROSSWORD
PUZZLES
>LEARNING
>MEMORY LOSS


MONEY AND BUDGET

RESOURCES

AMERICAN HEART
ASSOCIATION

LINKS AND RESOURCES



Home > Healing Foods >
Arthritis Diet > Here
COLLECTIVE
WIZDOM.COM

Healthy Body, Healthy Mind, Healthy Life

About Us

Register

Privacy Policy

Editorial Policy

Meet Our Medical  and Fitness Team

Contact Us

Disclaimer : All information on www.collectivewizdom.com is for educational purposes only. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice. For
specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, please consult your doctor.
(c) copyright collectivewizdom.com 2007 -2018 and all prior years. All rights reserved

Collectivewizdom,LLC is located at 340 S Lemon Ave #2707 Walnut, CA 91789
Subscribe in a reader
Custom Search
Avocado and soybeans helps to ease
arthritis stiffness and pain.