Why Is My Nose Dry? -- Causes and
Top 10 Natural Remedies

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August 31, 2011, last updated July 7, 2014

By Louise Carr, Associate Editor and Featured Columnist










Dry weather and air conditioning are just two of the things that
can suck the moisture from your nasal passages, leaving you
with a seriously dry nose. The inside of your nose is highly
sensitive and prone to irritation, congestion and
bleeding. When
a dry nose strikes it can be difficult to ignore. Many of us suffer
from a dry nose that makes everyday life unpleasant and difficult.

However, the condition is surprisingly difficult to define. Dry
nose can mean different things to different people. Do you feel
your nose is dry, or do you see visible signs of dryness? Does
the dryness cause irritation? Does the dryness make your nose
bleed? All these symptoms characterize a dry nose. What makes
your nose dry? How can you soothe a dry nose? Can dry nasal
passages cause other health problems?

What Causes a Dry Nose?

The biggest cause of dry nose is dry air, according to the Ear,
Nose & Throat Center in Colorado. If you live in a hot and dry
climate, use air conditioning or put the heating on in the winter
you are at greater risk of a dry nose.


Dry nose often accompanies dry mouth, a condition known as
xerostomia, which also increases the risk of having dry lips, dry
eyes and dry skin.

Your nose is a sensitive and efficient worker but it needs
humidity to do its job properly. Your nose transports moist air to
the lungs so that the lungs can effectively exchange oxygen and
carbon dioxide in the blood. Dry membranes in the lungs can’t
dissolve the gases. Turbinates, small ridges in the nose, are lined
with moist membranes that secrete mucous and water to mix
with the incoming air. If the air coming in is already moist, the
turbinates in the nose don’t have to work so hard to humidify. If
the air is dry, the lining of the nose will dry out and may crack
and bleed.

According to a 2011 report from the Division of Sinus and Skull
Base Surgery, Hospital Karlsruhe, Germany the relevant diseases
associated with dry nose are rhinitis sicca, primary and
secondary rhinitis atrophicans, and "empty nose syndrome".
Rhinitis sicca is a chronic condition causing dryness of the
mucous membranes.

Rhinitis atrophicans is described as atrophy of the mucous
membrane and glands. Both are classified as non
-allergic rhinitis
– a condition not caused by allergies but by environmental
factors like the climate. According to 2001 research from Brown
University School of Medicine, non
-allergic rhinitis probably
affects up to 17 million Americans.

As mentioned, one disease which can cause dry nose is the
strangely-named condition called "empty nose syndrome".
Empty nose syndrome is a medical term used to describe a nose
with inadequate turbinates. Empty nose syndrome causes
dryness of the nose and the pharynx,
shortness of breath,
congestion and difficulty sleeping.

Dry nose may also be caused by the side effects of medications
like antihistamines and decongestants. The overuse of nasal
sprays contributes to a dry nose.

A dry nose is one of the effects of
Sjogren’s syndrome, an
autoimmune disease affecting the mucous membranes and
glands that produces dry eyes and mouth.

Fortunately, a dry nose is very rarely a cause for serious concern

with one important exception. Having a dry nose may predispose
you to develop asthma. If allergic rhinitis is the cause of your
dry nose, this may put you at greater risk for developing
asthma, according to a 2001 study from the Department of
Allergy and Respiratory Diseases, University Hospital and
INSERM, in Montpellier, France.

Moreover, i
f you also experience difficulty breathing, or a high
fever you need to seek emergency medical help. But a dry nose
can be uncomfortable and irritating, affecting your sense of well-
being and your quality of life. Can a dry nose be treated? What
are the remedies for a dry nose?

Top 10 Natural Remedies for Dry Nose





























Treating a dry nose focuses on a handful of everyday
procedures as well as some little-known remedies that can also
help to ease the dryness. We looked at the available medical
evidence for the best ways to get rid of the symptoms of dry
nose.

1.
Water Your Dry Nose

One of the best, and most effective, ways to hydrate your nose
is to hydrate your body. Increase the amount of water you drink
so your nose can produce more mucous. Aim for a least six
glasses of water a day. Water is best because it is calorie-free,
but you can drink small amounts of juice for variety.  (Read
more about
how much water you should drink if you exercise.)

2.
A Humidifier Helps Beat a Dry Nose

According to the Ear, Nose & Throat Center in Colorado, if the
humidity of your house or room is less than 50 percent the
turbinates in your nose can swell and cause congestion as well
as a dry nose. Use a humidifier to increase the moisture in the air
you breathe. Try a small humidifier or vaporizer in the room
where you sleep and keep the windows and doors closed to trap
the moisture in the room. Make sure you keep the humidifier
clean and free from mold or bacteria that could cause you
additional problems on top of your dry nose.

3.
Chili Peppers Treat a Dry Nose

Here’s one you may not have thought about – chilies for treating
a dry nose brought about by non
-allergic rhinitis. Despite chilies’
fiery reputation, it seems they could be useful for treating sinus
inflammation and nasal congestion in people with non
-allergic
rhinitis, which can contribute to a dry nose.  

A 2011 study from the University of Cincinnati found a nasal
spray derived from Capsicum annum chili peppers and eucalytus
helped almost 100% of patients improve their symptoms of non
-
allergic rhinitis.

The Cincinnati study was actually not the first study to discover
that capsaicin is a natural remedy for dry nose. That honor
belongs to researchers  from Erasmus Medical Centre,
Rotterdam in The Netherlands, whose 2003 study was a
landmark in nasal research.

4.
Is Petroleum Jelly Safe For a Dry Nose?

Many people use petroleum jelly in the inside of the nose to
soothe the symptoms of dry nose. But is petroleum jelly safe to
use in this way?

On rare occasions, the inhalation of fat-based substances (called
lipoids) like petroleum jelly can cause lung problems. When you
use petroleum jelly inside the nose most of it is usually
swallowed. However, the jelly can travel through your windpipe
into your lungs, where it can build up and cause inflammation.
This lung inflammation is called "lipoid pneumonia" and it can be
very serious. If you want to use a lubricant in the nose, play it
safe and choose a water-based product or aloe vera gel.

5.
Bioflavonoids Can Help Treat the Symptoms of a Dry Nose

A dry nose often comes accompanied with nose bleeds, a
distressing and uncomfortable side effect of a dry nose.
According to experts, bioflavonoids can help to prevent
nosebleeds. Bioflavonoids are substances in plants that give
fruits and vegetables their distinctive colors. According to a
1993 study from Service de Médecine Interne, Hôpital de Pessac,
France, 96 people with fragile capillaries in the nose discovered
that a combination of the bioflavonoids diosmin and hesperidin
decreased the number of nosebleeds they experienced.

6.
Eucalyptus as a Dry Nose Remedy

Eucalyptus has been extensively tested as a remedy for the
common cold, and could also be used as a remedy to reduce the
symptoms of congestion and sinus blockage that accompany a
dry nose. According to a 2004 study from HNO-Frankeiten,
Clinical Research, Aachen, Germany the use of eucalyptus at a
dose of 200mg three times a day improved symptoms of nasal
congestion associated with the common cold.

7.
Is Yellow Dock Herb Recommended For Dry Nose?




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